Race & Events FAQ

Questions

  1. Who organizes the races and why aren’t there more races in my area?
  2. Why should I join a club?
  3. If I am a member of a club or team, do I need to wear their jersey when racing?
  4. I don’t agree with the results that are posted; what should I do?
  5. Where can I find race results?
  6. Where can I find points standings?
  7. Who / what are Commissaires?
  8. A Commissaire penalized me at a race. I don’t agree with it. Now what?
  9. I received an invoice for a monetary fine in the mail for something I did at a race. Do I have to pay it?
  10. If a Commissaire instructs me to stop racing or to do something else, do I have to?
  11. Where will I find the on-line registration link for a race that I am interested in?

Answers

1. Who organizes the races and why aren’t there more races in my area?

Cycling is a mostly a volunteer sport. The clubs and teams for each cycling discipline organize races and do much of the work of organizing and running the sport in each community. Cycling BC is the coordinating or governing body that works with clubs and teams to set the race calendar for each discipline, to training coaches and officials, and to provide insurance, membership, and race licenses to members. Development of cycling is a joint responsibility of Cycling BC and its member clubs and teams. If you find that there aren’t enough races in your area, you’re probably right!

This is because there probably aren’t enough clubs in your area organizing races. You can contact Cycling BC to find out if there is a Cycling club in your area that you can join. If not, Cycling BC can help you and some friends to form a Cycling Club so that you can start holding races and attracting more people into the sport where you live. Many hands make light work, and more racing for all to enjoy.

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2. Why should I join a club?

Clubs are the engine that drives the sport in all of its disciplines – Mountain Bike, Road, Track, Cyclo-cross, and BMX. Without strong and vital clubs that organize races, learn to ride and race clinics, and hold group rides and activities, the sport can’t grow. Riding and racing alone can be fun, but riding and racing together with others who are interested making the sport succeed can also be really satisfying; more than that, you’ll get to know and ride with other like-minded people. Clubs can also be a great support mechanism and resource for you as you learn more about the sport.

3. If I am a member of a club or team, do I need to wear their jersey when racing?

Yes. This is how other members of your team can be easily identified within the race.

4. I don’t agree with the results that are posted; what should I do?

It is always possible that there is a mistake in the results. If you think this is the case, contact the race organizer. If a review of the timing and finish order documents can uncover a mistake, then the results may be corrected up to 30 days after the race in question. Unfortunately, race results can’t change unless there is documented evidence that a mistake has been made. As a note, in some types of race, particularly circuit races such as Road Criteriums, Cyclo-cross races, or XC Mountain Bike races, since lapped riders are sometimes left in the race and not pulled out, it is easy to think that you did better than you actually did. In these types of races, the officials keep records of the passing order at the finish line at each lap; these records are then used to make sure that the final finish order is correct.

5. Where can I find race results?

Results for races held in 2010 or earlier can sometimes be found on the Cycling BC web site in the section corresponding to the cycling discipline that you are interested in. Alternatively, the can often be found on the web site of the club, team, or organization that held the race. Results for races held in 2011 or later can be found on the Cycling BC web site. They are posted as soon as the results are received from the Race Organizer, in the correct format for our results tracking system. Most results are available within a few days of the race in questions.

6. Where can I find points standings?

Points standings for upgrades, or for race series held in 2010 or earlier can sometimes be found on the Cycling BC web site in the section corresponding to the cycling discipline that you are interested in. Upgrade points are only maintained for those categories for which they matter. Currently, upgrade points are maintained for:

  • Road: Category 3 and 4 men and women
  • Cyclo-cross: Category 3 and 4 men (no upgrade points are maintained for women, as the women categories currently race in the same group)
  • MTB XC: Senior Expert Men, Senior Expert Women
  • MTB DH: Senior Expert Men, Senior Expert Women
  • BMX: The number of wins for Novice and Intermediate riders is maintained

BC Cup Series points are only maintained for those categories eligible to participate in a BC Cup series for that discipline. Points standings are updated as soon as possible after race results in the correct format are received. If there is a delay in receiving results from race organizers, then there is unfortunately, a delay in updating the points.

7. Who / what are Commissaires?

Commissaires are the race officials, or referees for Cycling races in every discipline. They generally have the same responsibilities and range of powers as referees or umpires in other sports. That is, they control the sporting action of the race, decide the finish order, and penalize any infractions of the rules. Commissaires are participants in the sport just as are riders, coaches, and team managers. If you’re interested in becoming a Commissaire, visit the Officiating section of the Cycling BC web site (coming soon). Being a Commissaire can be a fun and satisfying way to help the sport grow.

8. A Commissaire penalized me at a race. I don’t agree with it. Now what?

You are entitled to disagree with a penalty levied against you as the result of a race incident; however, the decisions made by the Commissaires for the situation in question are considered to be final and are not open to appeal. This is much the same as in other sports. Officials are trained to refrain from issuing penalties unless they are sure that the penalty is appropriate.

9. I received an invoice for a monetary fine in the mail for something I did at a race. Do I have to pay it?

Yes; non-payment of fines may eventually result in your suspension. Riders with fines left outstanding at the end of the year will not be eligible to have their licenses renewed until such time as the fine is paid. The amount of fines left unpaid longer than 3 months is increased by 25%.

10. If a Commissaire instructs me to stop racing or to do something else, do I have to?

Yes; Commissaires are responsible for controlling the sporting action of the race. If they judge that you have committed some serious fault, or are no longer competitive in the race (particularly in circuit races), they have the right to instruct you to stop racing and leave the course. In general, riders must obey instructions given by Commissaires, unless doing so would place their safety in immediate risk. Failure to do so may result in a penalty.

11. Where will I find the on-line registration link for a race that I am interested in?

Look at the race calendar for the appropriate discipline and visit the race organizer’s web page. Most race organizers have a link to on-line registration on their event web site.

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