BMX

About

A BMX race can be described as sprint cycling over a specially prepared dirt race track. Races are run on tracks that are usually 300-400 meters long and consist of a series of jumps and bumps with banked corners known as “berms”.

BMX prides itself on the ability to offer equal opportunities to both sexes and top class competitive sport to all members. It is common for the whole family to be involved.

BMX bikes come in a range of frame sizes from the Mini for the very young rider, through the expert, pro to the XL and even the XXL. One major variation is a slightly bigger BMX bike fitted with 24″ wheels called a cruiser. Cruisers are made in a range of sizes to suit young riders, and up to full size versions.

Long-Term Athlete Development

BMX is really two sports. For young riders, up to about 12 years old, BMX racing is fun, fast and competitive. Winning races may seem important, but what really counts are fun, friendship, developing skills, and learning the lessons of sport. By participating in BMX as one of many sports, the rider develops physical literacy, the basic movement and sport skills–which are the foundation of athleticism.

When the rider is ready, beginning around age 13 or 14, he or she can start developing the physical  abilities, competition skills and experience that leads to World Championship and Olympic podiums. Reaching the top in this sport takes years of hard work and dedication. It demands excellent skills, athletic abilities, speed and power. There is a secret to success: well-developed BMX skills and the overall athleticism learned in other sports is the first step onto the podium. Without those skills, it is difficult to reach the highest levels.

Cycling Canada’s BMX Long-Term Development Model was created to help Canadian BMXers onto international podiums, but also to ensure that every athlete can enjoy participation in cycling for a lifetime.

Categories and Upgrades

Riders with BMX licenses can have ability categories for the 20” class as follows:

Males:

  • Novice: Riders new to the sport; they have less than 8 race wins. One of the “Challenge” categories.
  • Intermediate: Riders with some experience; these riders have less than 25 wins as an intermediate. One of the “Challenge” categories.
  • Expert: Highly skilled amateur riders. One of the “Challenge” categories.
  • Junior: One of the two “Championship” categories. Riders aged 17 or 18 who elect this status. Sometimes called “pro” riders or money class riders, as these categories can win prize money.
  • Elite: One of the two “Championship” categories. Riders 19 and older who elect this status. Sometimes called “pro” riders or money class riders, as these categories can win prize money.
  • Master: Riders 19 and older who elect this status.

Females:

  • Novice: Riders new to the sport; they have less than 25 race wins. One of the “Challenge” categories.
  • Expert: Highly skilled amateur riders. One of the “Challenge” categories.
  • Junior: One of the two “Championship” categories. Riders aged 17 or 18 who elect this status.
  • Elite: One of the two “Championship” categories. Riders 19 and older who elect this status.

Within the 20” bicycle class, categories are determined first by the rider’s age group, and then by their ability category as described above. Riders must upgrade when they earn the number of race wins described in the lists above. For the Cruiser bicycle class, there are no ability categories. Riders only race in their age categories. Riders who are Junior or Elite for 20” are also Junior or Elite for Cruiser.

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